Academic publications

‘Introduction: Transnationalizing Russian Studies’, Professor Andy Byford, Dr Connor Doak, Professor Stephen Hutchings. Introduction in Transnational Russian Studies (2019), pp. 1-36. Edited by Andy Byford, Connor Doak, and Stephen Hutchings. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.

‘RT and the Digital Revolution: Reframing Russia for a Mediatized World’, Professor Stephen Hutchings. Chapter 17 in Transnational Russian Studies (2019), pp. 283-300. Edited by Andy Byford, Connor Doak, and Stephen Hutchings. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.

‘Transnational, Multinational, or Imperial? The Paradoxes of Russia’s (Post)coloniality’, Professor Vera Tolz. Chapter 1 in Transnational Russian Studies (2019), pp. 37-49. Edited by Andy Byford, Connor Doak, and Stephen Hutchings. Liverpool: Liverpool University Press.

‘Differentiated visibilities: RT Arabic’s narration of Russia’s role in the Syrian war’, Dr Deena Dajani, Professor Marie Gillespie, Dr Rhys Crilley, Media, War & Conflict, online version (2019), pp. 1-22.

‘Challenging the “Information War” Paradigm: Russophones and Russophobes in Online Eurovision Communities’, Dr Vitaly Kazakov and Professor Stephen Hutchings. Chapter 7 in Freedom of Expression in Russia’s New Mediasphere (2019), pp. 137-158. Edited by Mariëlle Wijermars and Katja Lehtisaari. London: Routledge.

‘The cultural politics of commemoration: Media and remembrance of the Russian revolutions of 1917’, Dr Precious N. Chatterje-Doody, Professor Marie Gillespie, European Journal of Cultural Studies, online version (2019), pp. 1-10.

‘Regime legitimation, not nation-building: Media commemoration of the 1917 revolutions in Russia’s neo-authoritarian state’, Dr Precious N. Chatterje-Doody and Vera Tolz, European Journal of Cultural Studies, online version (2019), pp. 1-19.

‘Revolution from the margins: Commemorating 1917 and RT’s scandalising of the established order’, Professor Stephen Hutchings, European Journal of Cultural Studies, online version (2019), pp. 1-20.

‘Tweeting the Russian revolution: RT’s #1917LIVE and social media re-enactments as public diplomacy’, Dr Rhys Crilley, Professor Marie Gillespie, Dr Alistair Willis, European Journal of Cultural Studies, online version (2019), pp. 1-20.

‘Making Sense of Emotions and Affective Investments in War: RT and the Syrian Conflict on YouTube’, Dr Precious N. Chatterje-Doody and Dr Rhys Crilley in ‘Public Discussion in Russian Social Media’, Media and Communication, 7:3 (2019), pp. 167-178.

‘Populism and contemporary global media: populist communication logics and the co-construction of transnational identities’, Dr Precious N. Chatterje-Doody and Dr Rhys Crilley (2019) in Populism and World Politicsedited by David MacDonald, Dirk Nabers and Frank Stengel, Palgrave Macmillan.

‘What to do about social media? Politics, populism and journalism’,  Dr Rhys Crilley and Professor Marie Gillespie, Journalism, 20:1 (2018), pp. 173-176.

‘Broadcasting agitainment: a new media strategy of Putin’s third presidency’, Professor Vera Tolz and Dr Yuri Teper, Post-Soviet Affairs, 34:4 (2018), pp. 213-227.

‘International relations in the age of ‘post-truth’ politics’, Dr Rhys Crilley, International Affairs, 94:2 (2018), pp. 417-425.

‘Security studies in the age of ‘post-truth’ politics: in defence of poststructuralism’, Dr Rhys Crilley and Dr Precious N Chatterje-Doody, Critical Studies on Security, online version (2018), pp. 1-5.

‘Fake news and ‘post truth’: some preliminary notes’, Professor Stephen Hutchings, Russian Journal of Communication, 9:2 (2017), pp. 212-214.

‘Staging the Sochi Winter Olympics 2014 on Russia Today and BBC World News: From soft power to geopolitical crisis’, Professor Stephen Hutchings, Professor Marie Gillespie, Dr Ilya Yablokov, Dr Alexander Voss, Mr Ilia Lvov, Participations: Journal of Audience and Reception Studies, May 2015.